Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
Today 14
News 9
( more )
STATION
CNNW 37
CSPAN 37
MSNBCW 37
KGO (ABC) 31
FOXNEWS 26
CSPAN2 25
MSNBC 22
WMAR (ABC) 17
CNN 15
KNTV (NBC) 14
KTVU (FOX) 12
ALJAZAM 11
WRC (NBC) 10
KPIX (CBS) 9
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 9
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 401
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 401 (some duplicates have been removed)
mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. ♪ >>> a new development monday at america's once mighty retailer jcpe
opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. and you can kiss that puppy goodbye, chula vista would answer back. they would come up clutch. jianca rlo, and california is back on top, 4-3. but buckle up, this game was a rollercoaster ride. the bottom of the fifth, they ♪ >>> a new development monday at america's once mighty retailer jcpenney. bill akman is dumping his shares in the company, 39 million of them. last week i told you how he used his influence to bring in ron johnson to remake jcpenney. now it's stock is down more than 30% this year alone. ron johnson is long gone, and akman has pie in his face, so he is selling his shares. so the sa
. ♪ mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> al jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot >>> welcome back to "inside story." nasa scientists say the destructive power of these fires is here to stay and will likely get worse. earlier i spoke with nasa scientist douglas morton and asked him about how this current season fits
these products that land in your home. so let's tap into what is going on in america's factories. we have the chief economist from the national association of manufacturers. chad, thanks for being with us. obviously a lot of the goods that eric will sell, some of them are not made in america. so the drop in durable goods is not just a reflection on manufacturing, and this is an industry that has shown remarkable strength at times as this economic recovery has been going on. so give me your sense of this. >> we have seen a renaissance in manufacturing since the end of the recession. we have added about 500,000 workers. i mean just last week we had a study that said that u.s. manufacturing is going to be much more competitive over the next decade, and that's definitely one of those trends that you continue to hear more about. >> but competitiveness can be a code word for meaning you can make more stuff per hour worked. so a manufacturing resurgence has not meant a manufacturing job return. >> as i said we have added 500,000 workers in the sector over all, and you are continuing to see much
. visit america's best today tosk about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you this summer, new york state is back and open for business. with endless beaches, hundreds of miles for hiking...or biking. endless rivers and streams ready to take your breath away. and more than enough wineries to please every pallet. we're ready to make your new york state vacation perfect. there's never been a better time to vacation in new york state. plan your vacation at iloveny.com the new state of new york. welcome. >>> now from abc2 maryland's most accurate forecast. >> good morning. let's look at maryland's most powerful radar as of now. and we are nice and dry but we see showers and thunderstorms now in west virginia and also western maryland. this is working its way off towards the east. so before it's all said and done we could get showers and storms. more isolated and scattered in nature as we continue through the morning. and possibly still linger as we go into the -- lingering as we g
for our pre game report. what is coming up on tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever. >> thank you. >> some members of the 1972 miami dolphins will be skipping a white house ceremony about their win. tonight's outrage hating panel is outraged. and a new poll which ask is the hottest, the dumbest, the craziest and more. our panel will insult all of you at one point or another. and sunny, the new portuguese water dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> thank you, we'll see you at the end. let's welcome our guest. despite what we put her through on this show she returns our e-mails and schools back. imogen lloyd webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. it is jake fogelness. check it out on something called itunes. bill schulz. he thinks she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. >> what
bila for a pre game report. jedediah, what is coming up ongp tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever.v our top story, some members of ths e 1972 miami dolphins will be swimming a white house ceremonyny because they don't like obama's politics. welcome to the club, boys. are they principal and admirable or meanies out to hurt our president's feelings. >> and a new poll asks which are the hottest, dumbest,t, craziest and we will find out more. and finally you will meet sunny, the family's new dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> see you at the end. let's welcome our tabes. well, despite what we put herde through on this show for several years she still returns our e-mails asking her to come back. i am here with imogen lloydebbe webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the
to what could be a turning point for america and our involvement in syria. tonight, violent new clashes erupting right where the alleged chemical weapons attacks took place this week. and this evening a haunting new number. one million children sent fleeing from the violence, without homes, some of them ripped from their parents. that's the equivalent of all the children in boston and los angeles combined. tonight it's what the president is now saying about those alleged chemical attacks that signals america might soon be involved. abc's martha raddatz in the region on what it was the president said. >> reporter: these are the images that have had the white house huddled in marathon meetings. the suspected chemical attack, syrian women, children, estimates ranging upward of 1,000 killed. >> what we've seen indicates this is clearly a big event of grave concern. >> reporter: speaking to cnn, the president raising the stakes. >> that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has. >> reporter: syria's chaos. its chemical weapons and its breeding of terror, a thr
.s. aid, and an alliance that is one of america east most important in the middle east. and authorities have arrested mohammed badie. separately judicial officials say a court will review a petition to release, hosni mubarak. mubarak is waiting to be retried on charges of being behind the killi killings that take place. >>> and demonstrators waved flags and posters of ousted president, morsi. egypt's cabinet says more than 850 civilians have been killed in the last week. the muslim brotherhood puts the toll much higher. let's begin in washington with mike viqueira. mike what is the latest on the meeting with the president and his national security team? >> well that meeting broke up just a short time ago, tony. we don't yet have a readout. we know egypt was certainly tops on the agenda. what to do about u.s. aid that is still blowing after the chaos, killing and carnage. under mounting pressure to halt payments to egypt, today a flat denial from the white house that aid has already been cut off. >> this is not just a faucet in which you turn the spigot. whether tranches of aid have gone
.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
. she grew up speaking english and spanish and became a hit in latin america as well. >>> eydie gorme died yesterday in los angeles. she was 84-year-old. and there is this note tonight about a hidden gem. 12-year-old michael of north carolina was on a family visit to the crater of diamond state park in arkansas when he hit genuine pay dirt. not just any diamond, but a 5.16 carat brown diamond. it's the 27th largest diamond found since the park opened back in 1972 and the 8th largest brown diamond. it's not known just how much it's worth yet. it's still in the rough. and up next sharing skilled and building a field of dreams. ,000 these champions are making a difference. these champions ara difference. these champions are difference. these champions are difference. these champions are difference. these champions are difference. hthese champions are difference. othese champions are difference. wthese champions are difference. these champions area difference. my mantra? trust your instincts to make the call. to treat my low testosterone, my doctor and i went with axiron, the only underar
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
>> it's august 30th. this is a fox news alert. america loses a key ally. america's top ally now backing out. what that means about a possible strike going forward. the biggest union leader in the united states turning sour on obama care. >> when the act is put together it wasn't thought completely through. >> not thought completely through. can they win the healthcare battle with the unions jumping ship. >> it is not just your wallets with economic pain. even the tooth fairy is getting hit. kids receiving more than ever now. "fox & friends first" starts right now. >> good morning to the city who never sleeps. you can see that outside this morning. you are watching "fox & friends first" on this friday morning. i am heather nauert. >> i am patti ann browne. thank you for starting your day with us. we begin with a fox news alert. president obama in a bind after america's bigs ally backs away from taking action in syria. go to doug luzader live in washington with the latest. >> good morning. whatever coalition the president was hoping to build here now appears to be in at that timer
. >> democracy is at its best when they all have a seat at the table. but in america there's a big gap. we need more women in office. >> men hold 82% of the seats in the house of representatives. a decade ago, our nation ranked ninth 57 nations as a percentage of women in congress. today we are 92nd. out of 50 governors come just five are women. that's 10%, the same percentage as the number of women mayors in the 100 largest cities. out of more than 7000 state legislators, fewer than one in four are women. that's barely higher than it was two decades ago. at this rate women will be underrepresented in the united states for another 500 years. a century ago in 1920, the decades long struggle for women to win the righ right to vocal e in the 19th amendment to the constitution. inspired by that struggle, representation 2020 takes on this centrist challenge for women. we must have parity for women in office. that will happen when any given election a woman is just as likely as a man to win and in any given legislature, women will be just likely told them. i founded the white house project where we t
, and are responsible, here in america, you can make it if you try. >>> even as this pecks increasingly crucial to get into the middle class, the cost of a college education is going further and further out of reach. with the average student borrower graduating more than $26,000 in dead. at the university of buffalo today, the president said that has to change. >> higher education is still the best ticket to upward mobility. if we don't do something about keeping it within reach, it will create problems for economic mobility for generations to come. that's not acceptable. >>> to help make that change hahn happen, the president is propose a plan to tie federal aid to the schools offering, using a variety of metrics to reward the schools helping students from all -- if enacted it would be the biggest change since 1965. but as the president noted, that could be a big if. >> we've seen a faction of republicans in congress that suggest that maybe america shouldn't pay its bills that have already been run up, that we should shut down government if they can't shut down obamacare. we can't afford in washingto
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
was an intern at bank of america in london, worked eight all-nighers in two weeks. we have more. >> the signs were there, but for the student, it was too late. the young student from germany was nearing the end of his internship at bank of america's investment on merle lunch when he died at his home. he had reportedly just worked 72 hours when he collapsed in the shower. his profile on a social media website had an ambitious streak, a pressure to outdo a fellow worker for a position. >> those individuals are so driven, so key to get a job, that they push themselves and in the end, push themselves over the edge. it's up to the leader of the team to see what's happening and even if these individuals keep volunteering for work, which some of them will do, to turn around and say no, you've done enough, you node to go and have some rest. >> an internship at a high pro tile company is seen as a valuable recruitment doing, putting pressure on interns to accel. many say interns do work punishing schedules in the banking industry, offering a glimpse of what's to item if they gain employment in the pro
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
of deciding to take a year au off instead. it is called a gap year. >> george: and some of america's top universities, hathey actually support it. not too long ago, i came across three teens who were on the global journey of a lifetime. this is the story of three 19-year-olds. ♪ >> george: who decided to live for almost a year outside their comfort zones. lady douglas is from amarillo, texas. >> god totally broke down every part of me, every inch of me. >> jesus, i thank you so much for this day. thank you so much for the way that you provided for us throughout this trip, god. >> kristin hendrix is from norman, oklahoma. >> i have grown up in a christian home and in a christian school, to where that is all i have been surrounded with. i wasn't able to truly make my faith my own. >> george: and kara crenshaw is from jackson, tennessee. >> after high school, i was kind of, like, tired of being in a classroom. you're in a classroom for 13 years, and you're expected to go to college right after that. i wanted to get out and see the world. >> george: the teenagers signed up with camp kegel,
to one person. it belongs to the people of america and i think whoever lives in it should preserve its tradition and enhance it and leave something of themselves there. next on booktv author susan crawford talks about her book "captive audience" the telecom industry and monopoly power in the new gilded age. she argues that america's economic future could be threatened by other countries that have internet capabilities that are faster and cheaper. author andrew blum hosts this hour-long discussion. >> host: thank you for being here and thank you for doing this. >> guest: i've been looking forward to talking to you. >> host: what is the status of rock band in america today? >> guest: well we have a picture that is quite different than the other developed nations. we have got very high download speeds in america cable and local monopolies in each region of the country that dominate that market and sell for 85% of americans their only choice where they live is going to be their local cable monopoly. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in
>>> good morning, america. final countdown. a huge blow for the u.s., as britain bows out of an attack on syria. the white house now ready to go it alone. new details right now about the strike that could happen this weekend. >>> the nfl agrees to pay almost $800 million to thousands of players suffering from concussions on the field. but are they doing anything to prevent more injuries? we hear from one of football's most famous players. >>> i just remember asking what happened? >>> hospital horror. the unbelievable story of a brother who donated his kidney to save his sister's life. and a nurse mistakenly tossed it in the trash. we'll hear their emotional story this morning in an abc news exclusive. >>> and imagine your cherished wedding memories disappearing forever. that's what happened to hundreds when their wedding video company shut down with no one to call. this morning, one very tenacious recorder tracks down the hidden files. and with cameras rolling, we have very special reunions. >>> and good morning, america. big holiday weekend ahead. that last gasp of summer
here, representing the rule committees. i want to tell everybody in america, tom cole is a reasonable member of this house. he's been a leader of this house. he wants to seek common ground in my view. so i do not criticize him but i say, mr. speaker, as you tap the gavel, time is not only running out on steny hoyer, time is running out on this house, time is running out on erica, time is running out americans who know their house is not working and now i yield back the balance of my time but we should not yield the balance of time for the american people and for our country. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has no time to yield back. the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from oklahoma is recognized. mr. cole: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cole: my friend, and he is my friend is really one of the great speakers in this chamber. i mean that with all sincerity. but this isn't the senate. we don't have unlimited debate over here. kind of stretching it a little bit. but it's alway
that there are states in america now that have fully legalized the use of marijuana but for recreational and medical use. are you tempted to take vivian out of new jersey and go somewhere like colorado, for example, where it's all completely legal? >> absolutely. it's a decision that we discuss every single day. we actually decided after christie's announcement on friday that we were going to give ourselves this week to not talk about it, regroup, and then see where we are next week. but a year is a year of seizures and only if we have to move their temporarily to get vivian on the treatment as soon as possible, that's what we'll do. we're not going to stop at anything to help our daughter. >> and how is she at the moment, would you say, brian? >> today she was pretty good. yesterday she had a bad day. every day it's very intermittent. sometimes she'll have a good day, partial day. right now she's doing good because she's upstairs sleeping in her crib. >> she's a moody 2-year-old. ask us by the minute how she's doing. some days are better than others. we like that actually because that's a normal side t
>>> good morning, america. and breaking overnight, a sudden and massive hailstorm, knocking out towns in the west. cars filled. snowplows are forced to clean it all up. entire streets turn to rivers, as a week of flash flooding looms. and the fire at yosemite, now tripling in size. zblanchts breaking at this hour. president obama's tough words on the syria crisis right now. calling the potential use of chemical weapons there, a grave concern. >> no doubt that when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale, and again, we're still gathering information about this particular event. but it is very troublesome. >>> and a surprise this morning. ♪ batman >> the new batman revealed. oscar-winner, ben affleck, will be bruce wayne. the choice makes headlines worldwide, as he gets set to go up against superman. >>> and a major announcement this morning about these two adorable cubs. "gma's" exclusive access to the nursery of the only panda twins in america, as they wave good morning, america. >>> they were waving on the inside, lara. i'm sure. hello, america. good morning t
elected. i wanted to do health care. >> here in america, in the wealthiest nation on earth, no illness or accident should lead to any family's financial ruin. >> you need to pay attention to what's happening in your backyard. >> defund obama care. >> defund obama care sue repeal obama care. ♪ ♪ i want it now, i want it all >> i wanted to do health care because i knew it could change the country and i knew it could help people. >> we see this coming. just like the tie tannic. >> on the ship we're going to die. >> are you saying that society should let him die? >> no. >> there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. all right? there are 47% who are with him who are -- who believe that they are victims. >> that's who the republicans are. we shouldn't be talking about infrastructure investment, investment in education, investment in workers and going round two on health care. >> i want to repeal the law of the land. is that clear. >> we will not back down from that fight. >> i've been very proud to do that. ♪ >> let's go. let's hit the road. >> good to h
this morning. >>> good morning, america. breaking this morning, funnel clouds reported right now over maryland. heavy rains over the west. two dead, so many running from the raging waters. 16 states in the flood zone right now. >>> and overnight, a shocking fall. a major league baseball game. a fan plunging 65 feet from the upper deck, right in front of horrified spectators. why does this keep happening? and what can be done to prevent it? >>> guardian angel revealed. the woman saved in the nick of time after her terrible accident on the highway finally meets the man who came out of nowhere to rescue her. wait until you hear what she said to him. >>> into the abyss. the fearless female daredevils defying gravity more than 3,000 feet in the air. why they say doing this is safe. the mind-blowing moves going viral this morning. >>> and good morning, america. robin and sam are off today. and it's shaping up to be a very busy tuesday. so much to get to. including the father of 16-year-old hannah anderson. he is now speaking out for the first time since hannah's kidnapping. what an ord
now. this is the 10:00 news on ktvu channel 2. >>> a scary start to the first race of the america's cup challenger finals in san francisco bay. one boat stalls on racecourse and another into the water. >> i'm ken pritchett in for ken wayne. >> i'm heather holmes. >> two sailors thrown into san francisco bay after their catamaran nose-dived at 46 miles per hour. bringing back memories of another america's cup accident that killed a cure member. jade hernandez live in san francisco. >> reporter: heather, today's race was supposed to be about the speed and skill of 72' catamarans on the bay, but instead it was about two teams trying to survive. both teams racing in the louis vuitton final cups struggled on the water. emirate's team new zealand was caught in a sharp turn, throwing two crew members overboard. >> all of a sudden it crashes. >> i was more worried about the people who fell over. both men pulled to safety only suffered bumps and bruises. >> it was quite a welcome to america's cup. >> reporter: these spectators weren't expecting the dramatic excitement. >> the safety
. [booing] over the next 15 months, we are going to decide what kind of america we want to have. what kind of kentucky want to have. there are only two answers to this question. barack obama's vision for america. or kentucky's. ground -- crowd does not like it. kentucky's voice is often the voice of opposition. to the obama agenda. i am proud of that. that is why every liberal in america, every liberal in america have announced they will beat us next year. know, the liberals are worried because it just as i predicted obama care is a disaster for america. [applause] i fought them every step of the way, every step of the government takeover. up to their war on coal. look, as long as i am in the senate, kentucky will have a voice. [applause] all of these liberals to come down here to push me around, they are not going to get away with it, are they? ind paul, it would fill, and -- ed whitfield, and i take the fight every single day. let me give you an example. a few months ago thomas the cannots decided that you fish below the dams below the river anymore. up the group and we got together with
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
american community. liberalism nearly destroyed black america. now it's time for black america to return the favor. >> greta: his goal is to support black conservative who's run for office. good night go to gretawire. ill:y factor is on. tonight: >> you can't give people the authorities the right to just stop somebody because of the color of their skin. >> bill: that argument is being used to shut down the police tactic of stop and frisk. tonight we will investigate whether privacy and civility trump safety. >> everybody screaming. i saw the blood all over. the blood on my chest and i start the getting shot more. i mean, i felt some bullets. >> bill: disturbing ruling. linking killer to al qaeda cannot be introduced. we will analyze. also tonight, charles krauthammer on children getting high on marijuana lou dobbs reporting on my cut backs because of obama care. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. why the debate over stop and frisk is so intense, that is the subject of thi
of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in america -- went against the grain of the great migration that went from south to the northern industrial cities and if it came west, it came to oakland, san fransisco, and l.a., but there was a tribe of black, black oakees from the south and southwest, who wanted to retain the rural lifestyle. it was very important for them to feel the wind at night, to be out in places where no one bothered them, to be close to the land. about 25-30,000 of them didn't go to the industrial cities. they went from rural to rural, following the cotton trail west, and james dixon was one of them. he was from louisiana. he worked in the railroads for a while as a porter. when i met him, he was -- he had a water pump here and a little pecan tree, and he was cutting down the pecan tree to burn fire to keep himself warm. he was five-foot-five, sleeping on a little iron crate. the crate was too small for him, so he had a wooden beekeeper's box for his head. there were -- i'll looking inside, and there were veinna sausage cans, empty ones, that had had put
that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill health. here she is traveling with the president. what did the country think of the president to know about her? >> it is an interesting dichotomy. this is the pattern of her life. she had been grossly miscast by history as this victorian invalid on the fainting couch. there were times when she was that way. she had chronic illnesses. one was seizure disorder, known as epilepsy. she had damage along her left leg which led to immobility. she also had a compromised immune system. she was susceptible to infections. t
with a 1:05 first pitch there and of course don't forget about america's cup always ongoing. you can expect big crowds there -- they have a race that gets started at one this afternoon. if you are heading into the city today you are probably going to have company and can probably expect heavy traffic. live this morning in san francisco, alex savage. >> you just heard him mention 49erss fan fest. today's event will be the last one held at candlestick park. >>> thousands of fans will be headed to the stick to watch the team practice and grab autographs. there will be live music, face painting, photograph booths and the only time training camp will be open to the public. the festival gets going at noon and you can watch practice from two to four. 49ers alumni, the gold rush cheerleaders and current player also be there to sign autographs. >> bart negotiations resume at ten and trains will almost certainly run on monday whether or not a deal is made this weekend. the governor plans to ask a judge to stop a strike if there is no deal by tomorrow. he filed his request for a cooling off period
>> booktv has been traveling the country exploring cities across america as our local content vehicle producers talk with authors and visit special collections and independent bookstores. .. a photographer or, who was a modern-day rickey allying walker evans, we pulled off to the side of the road, came up over the road attracts, across this dirt road here, posthumous vineyard with hold up to shack. basically a tar paper shack. as we walked up we could see there were rabbit furs that had been, that were hammered onto the wall. remember knocking once, twice i've misplaced the sun still in the door creak open and there stood this black man, who looked a cute lifted out of the mrs. a 1930s. he had a stutter. later he told us he can't bless with a stutter one state at a time. his name is james dixon. he was 95 and he was living here, happy to send the 40s. he was part of this migration? who did something no blacks in america, kind of win against the grain of the great migration. the great migration within the south to north industrial cities and came west to oakland san francisco a
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
putting his thumb right in america's eye. >> reporter: senator john mccain argued that the president underestimated his russian counterpart. >> and i know they like to focus on body language, and he's got that kind of slouch looking like the bored kid in the back of the classroom. >> the president comparing him to the kid in the back of the classroom, i think is very indicative of his lack of appreciation of who vladimir putin is. >> reporter: and renewed debate today about the president's defense of the nsa surveillance programs. >> finally came out last friday trying to come up with ways to salvage the program by window dressing. >> i applaud the president for bringing us there and talking about how do we educate the public that we need this program. >> reporter: all this as snowden's father says he now has the papers to visit his son in russia whom he continues to defend. >> what i would say is that my son has spoken the truth. >> reporter: now he also said today that he plans to take an attorney to russia with him to help his son fight the charges that he is facing in the united
. i think everything you said it plays into shaping that america for the future which will be different than we see today. >> great comment. lisa? >> i have a whole list. [laughter] first full employment would be awesome and 50 years to be about to say that we started somewhere in the 2020's mabey. we worked on this. you know, i just want to also talk about the fact we are in the house of labor and, you know, there's been a long history of pacific islanders in the history in the labour movement and in a union organizing and i feel like there are many, many causes that could be framed so they could get behind whether so it was the strikes in california. there are so many labor leaders but i think that it is a large rate of incarceration and racial profiling and the south asian community very much relates to that. i think the issue with photo id. you've got older african-americans and immigrants who are like, you know that is something we can mobilize a lot more. living wages and jobs. to work on a lot of the safety net ground nobody really talks about that anymore. ther
, good riddance. instead of a handout. >> reporter: so, behind me is america's eighth-largest city. and without question, one of its most beautiful. the question this morning, will this very ugly scandal finally come to an end? and, josh, we should know the answer to that in just a couple of hours. >> it's certainly been a long time coming. thank you, ryan owens for that. >>> we're going to turn to the story of a fisherman feared lost at sea, after falling overboard. but remarkably, he survives after treading water for hours. abc's john muller has the incredible story. >> reporter: this is the incredible moment when a 51-year-old fisherman finally makes it back on land, after almost 24 harrowing hours stranded at sea. steve moumouris' family, waiting in anticipation. >> he was in relatively good condition. dehydrated. but obviously happy to be alive. >> reporter: his story of survival begins wednesday afternoon, when moumouris set out for a fishing trip, off the coast of crystal river, florida. around 1:00 p.m., he texted his wife this picture of a fish he caught. when he headed ho
's happening in the part of the world where america and our allies are often hated. tonight we know more about what could lie ahead as changes are being made to protect our own. >>> also an appeal to stop the early release of 10,000 prisoners denied. one state is forced to let the inmates go free because of overcrowding. fox report, the number one concern now is publicovercrowdi. fox reports the number one concern now is public safety. and, coming to america from spain, the great bull run. you don't have to head overseas for this adrenaline rush. >>> america on high alert as the sun rises on a sunday on the other side of the world. several of our conflicts and embassies, the face of america in a foreign country will remain concerned about a threat that is real. in countries like yemen, jordan and egypt. beefing up additional security with troops and check points in the hopes of deterring any attacks. all told more than 2,000 embassies will remain closed as of today, sunday, in that part of the world. the state department also issuing a global travel alert to any american traveling overseas, wa
's making news. america's children are slimming down. for the first time in decades, we can say our children are not getting fatter. a study from the cdc that examined the nation's preschoolers found in 18 states, the obesity rate is actually falling. that's the good news. the bad news is the obesity rate held steady in do states. some of the states, ten states overall were examined due to the way data is collected. but a lot of people are crediting michelle obama's let's move campaign for this good news. it certainly helps keep the weight off. >> bill: she's got to get some credit for that. and just raising awareness of the problem. >> absolutely. that's the good news. >> bill: a lot of republicans are beating up on her saying this is silly. no, this is a serious problem. >> it really is. that was the good news. the bad news, of course, if you want to ruin your breakfast, taco bell is here to help. they announced they're kicking off a new breakfast item. they've been trying to kick off a breakfast menu in recent years but this latest hellish creation is the waffle taco. it is a fried waffle
yesterday in the idaho mountains. >> jamie: good morning, everyone. welcome to "america's news headquarters". i'm jamie colby. >> eric: i'm eric shawn. following that week-long manhunt that expand five states and sparked multiple amber alert, they were spotted at a camp ground. >> we had a lot of resources in that area, both on the ground and aerial resources. it's my understanding that the camp site was spotted from the air and that the ground units were sent into that area which eventually led to the confrontation. >> eric: hannah is now safe and sound. will carr on the ground live in cascade, eye idaho. >> reporter: good morning, eric. the local paper here in boise sums it up. suspect killed, teen girl safe. throughout this entirer ordeal, authorities said it was their top priority to make sure that hannah anderson came out of this safe and sound. they say that she is. she's at a hospital near boise. she's being evaluated. they tell us that she's in good shape and set to be reunited with her father later today. earlier this morning he actually spoke on "fox & friends" and over the phone
, but thousands of times a year. we're working to this story on a friday morning. welcome to "america's newsroom." martha: big one. bill: shocker. are you surprised? i'm thoroughly stunned. martha: you wonder what the next shoe to drop is. i'm martha maccallum. the nsa reportedly intercepted calls from americans on american soil. many times they say it was by accident. sometimes an area code was a mix-up between egypt and washington, d.c. but either way, when these mistakes were made, although we've been told that the government tried to be as transparent as possible, nobody was told that those mistakes were made and the information that we got in this report from the "washington post" last night comes from edward snowden, the man who leaked the initial information about the nsa program and now has temporary asylum in russia. bill: funny how that works, huh? senior white house foreign affairs correspondent wendell goler is on vacation with the president at martha's vineyard. actually wendell's working. the president is on vacation. what's the white house saying about this, wendell? >> reporter:
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 401 (some duplicates have been removed)